How To Make: Rice Pudding

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Welcome back to Tenacious Genealogy! Today is Friday, so I have another historical recipe for you! Old fashioned Rice Pudding. This time from a 1922 cookbook called ‘The Plain Sailing Cook Book’.

Original Recipe:

Title: The Plain Sailing Cook Book
Author: Susanna Shanklin Browne
Year: 1922

Ingredients:

1 pint milk
1 tablespoon rice
2 tablespoons sugar
1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons raisins

Utensils:
Tablespoon
Strainer
Baking dish

Instructions:
1. Soak raisins for half an hour in cold water
2. Wash the rice in a strainer and let the water drain away
3. Put the rice in a baking dish and add all the other materials
4. Stir together well, put the dish in a slow oven and bake about 2 hours. Stir every half-hour while it is baking, and increase the heat for the last few minutes, if necessary, to brown.

My Rendition:

Ingredients:

2 cups milk
1 tablespoon rice
2 tablespoons sugar
1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons raisins

Utensils:
Tablespoons
Strainer
Baking dish (preferably Pyrex)

Instructions:
1. Soak raisins for half an hour in cold water.
2. Wash the rice in a small strainer and let the water drain away.
3. Put the rice in a baking dish and add all the other materials.
4. Stir together well, put the dish in a slow oven (300-325° F) and bake about 2 hours. Stir every half-hour while it is baking, and increase the heat for the last few minutes, if necessary, to brown.

This recipe is simple and pretty straightforward. It won’t necessarily look like the rice pudding in the grocery store, but it tastes delicious!

The ingredients

 

I used whole milk because that is what I had at home when I made this – however next I might use skim milk or 1%. Something I noticed with this recipe is the fact that the milk fat tended to burn and clump together (which I didn’t necessarily find displeasing and the burnt parts were easy to remove), but the pudding ended up not being as smooth as I had hoped.

Raisins soaking for a half hour

 

I love that this recipe calls for raisins and not only that but soaking them beforehand to let them plump up a bit. In the end, it added a nice texture to the pudding.

All the ingredients mixed together.

 

I put all the ingredients in a small Pyrex baking dish and mixed them thoroughly. Next time, I might add the milk last, as the ingredients that I added after it were more difficult to mix than I had hoped.

The finished product!

Definitely browner and a bit more liquidy than the rice pudding you typically find in the grocery store. The recipe calls for stirring it every half hour and I highly recommend that to keep some of the ingredients (like the rice and raisins) from sinking to the bottom and burning. When it comes out of the oven, it will have a little bit of liquid on top. You can stir the pudding once again and let it sit to remove some of the liquid. (Due to the pudding technically still cooking.) I ended up not needing to up the temperature but depending on your oven and what kind of dish you use, you might.

Rice Pudding, anyone?

 

This is a really delicious dish, especially with whipped cream. It is sweet, but not overly so and the raisins add a nice texture.

Questions? Comments?

Questions or comments about this dish? Let me know down below! Have any recipes you are interested in me trying? Let me know as well! And if you like what you’ve been seeing here on Tenacious Genealogy – please subscribe to our email list. Not only will you stay up to date with the latest blog posts, but you’ll also get access to freebies such as ’10 Tips for Starting Your Genealogy’ and other fun ‘subscriber only’ items!

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